3 shows on now
View Calendar | Add a show
Artbash makes it easy (and free) to create a website if you are an artist or an art gallery.

Get started on your website now.
 

road works as ART, this is definitely not a painting

Forum > Off-site Articles

Comments:
41 to 60 of 62
william blake
29 articles & 728 comments since 15 Aug 2006
what about that other boxer actor de niro
duchamp-1 RobertDeNiropressconference
william blake
29 articles & 728 comments since 15 Aug 2006
ao..yes please
william blake
29 articles & 728 comments since 15 Aug 2006
last one.. i promise... scary though kirk douglas
244.douglas.kirk.101006 readymades250
benjamin
1 articles & 212 comments since 30 Nov 2007
WTF mathew???? 'Its important to realise that its not as if the public hasn,t had time to appreciate Duchamp....He's had roughly 35years longer than pollock to sink into thye public art consciousness.... but I don,t see any blockbuster films on him-unlike Pollock.'

jack the dripper was a misogynistic, egotistical, alcoholic, drug addict, who routinely shat on anyone who tried to help him. when not doing the above he was spouting the most absurd drivel.
"Jackson, how do you know when you're finished?" Pollock replied "How do you know when you're finished making love?"
paying the bill? cleaning up with toilet roll? smoking a cigarette? falling asleep?

hollywood has made plenty of movies about adolf hitler, has his art sunk into the public art consciousness?

there have been numerous hollywood films about artists, many of whom have not entered public art consciousness
benjamin
1 articles & 212 comments since 30 Nov 2007
walken, reno, malkovich
walken-1 reno-1 malk-1
mathew
3 articles & 203 comments since 2 Oct 2007
Whats your point, Benjamin?The point I was making was basically this....that if the ultimate validation of an art genre or movement or style-call it what u will-is the belated recognition of said art by the public ...then virtually all the major innovations of the modernist period have been recognised by the public, except the duchampian one. I don,t have proof of this ,of course,---its just an educated guess.
But the general public ignorance of his name, let alone what he stood for , in comparison with virtually all of the other major modernist artistic innovators, would suggest that the gulf between the academic appraisal of his canon, and the public one, is unbridgable.
In a nutshell, Joe blogs public will never accept that a urinal in a gallery is taonga, whilst the one out the door is not, whereas they are much more willing to accept the art status of objects that remain art in much, much, much more broader contexts.
Who cares what pollock was like personally....the point is that the public has by and large accepted "blue poles" as art, but still rejects the pissoir
Chris Taylor
1 articles & 308 comments since 30 Apr 2006
Willy, why all these macho guys? Duchamp was, shall we say, ambivalent.
250px-RroseSelavy Borden07
ao
75 comments since 16 Nov 2006
Matthew, I'd say Google has its finger on the pulse of what the public wants - Jeff Koons, direct heir to Duchamp's legacy is today (30.04.08) a poster boy on the search engine's homepage. This is pretty complete validation of Duchamp's 'style'.

Pollack is so well known because he was used as an emblem of Western individuality against the terrible freedom-hating commies. He was an advertisement by the Americans to the Americans (and anyone else who was listening).

WB - scans coming next time I'm near a scanner.
koonsGoogle
naturebirth
artandmylife
9 articles & 197 comments since 1 Feb 2008
I'd say part of the 'problem' was Duchamp the man, rather than the artist and so he was passed over in the public eye and now people just know the name rather than the work and its legacy. People like Koons are the pop-stars of art and therefore much more palatible to the general public. Maybe if Duchamp came on the scene now (or even just a bit later) it would be different as he may have been lauded as a bad-boy outsider??
benjamin
1 articles & 212 comments since 30 Nov 2007
mathew, there is something called pop art; warhol was Rrose Selavy's bastard child.

any lasting legacy or public consciousness there? (i could offer more examples to help educate your guesses, like ao's above)

Marcel Duchamp 'Pop Art is a return to "conceptual" painting, virtually abandoned, except by the Surrealists, since Courbet, in favour of retinal painting... If you take a Campbell soup can and repeat it 50 times, you are not interested in the retinal image. What interests you is the concept that wants to put 50 Campbell soup cans on a canvas.'


duchamp never courted the spotlight or the highlife in the monumentalist ways of picasso or pollock, or the media like warhol. he preferred to let his work do the talking while he was behind pseudonyms, playing chess with his friends.


william blake
29 articles & 728 comments since 15 Aug 2006
ben, i agree that Duchamp did not monumentally court the media but he certainly manipulated it in a way that was suited to his artistic production. Hence the many images of him at various stages of his career.

with the notion of media manipulation in mind I would hazard that pop was more of an adopted child than a bastard spawn.

CT I just couldnt find a likeness for Duchamp as Rose Cest la vie, as for macho; dont you think Duchamp, for all the beautifully applied makeup and fluttering hands looks like the typical bloke in a frock? He reminds me of Tony Curtis in 'some like it hot' .
mathew
3 articles & 203 comments since 2 Oct 2007
Of course, Benjamin, you are so correct about Duchamp,s legacy, vs-a-v the other modernist pioneers. Thats why dealer gallerys are just full to bursting with unaltered banal objects taken from daily life, whereas those dreadful takeoffs of ab ex, surrealism or expressionism are just so hard to find. I guess I must have been blind to the obvious.
benjamin
1 articles & 212 comments since 30 Nov 2007
wb - good point, but nearly all those photographs were taken by artists as art, of their friend/muse. they were not courting 'media coverage'. my personal favourite is by duane michals. duchamp certainly was/is a very important figure within the context of artistic production and therefore the 'art world';he certainly manipulated that in a process of exposing itself to itself. marcel duchamp by duane michals
Duchampsm
benjamin
1 articles & 212 comments since 30 Nov 2007
mathew, you are living in an unadulterated state of bliss. duchamp's legacy is within surrealism, dada, fluxus, minimalism, 80s excess art, ironic sculpture, etc. in fact his legacy is everywhere, if not noticeable, it is conspicuous by its absence. duchamp was influential in changing the context of art and its viewers.

now i'm not sure what the relevance of dealer galleries is, but know this... you yourself mentioned don driver in another thread - any dealer gallery legacy there?
ao
75 comments since 16 Nov 2006
Direct from an asylum in Siberia, its... Duchamp as evil genius (the artist is Kent Williams, http://www.kentwilliams.com... the comic is from the late eighties):
drneutron01 drneutron02 drneutron03
Art Vanderlay
1 articles & 57 comments since 19 Oct 2007
If you want more duchamp/de ni
Chris Taylor
1 articles & 308 comments since 30 Apr 2006
Perhaps this is it...a precurs
duchampchessnude
allblackwinz
Flake
46 articles & 641 comments since 26 Jan 2006
I agree Art Vanderlay, that's
allblackwinz
Flake
46 articles & 641 comments since 26 Jan 2006
And benjamin , as far as I kno
benjamin
1 articles & 212 comments since 30 Nov 2007
yes he was/did; but not as a m
Join or Login to comment
Page Loads
1 2 4 9 9