3 shows on now
View Calendar | Add a show
Artbash makes it easy (and free) to create a website if you are an artist or an art gallery.

Get started on your website now.
 

bad joke

Forum > Architecture

image026 by Pinnochio
49 Comments

The graduate with a Science degree asks, "Why does it work?"

The graduate with an Engineering degree asks, "How does it work?"

The graduate with an Accounting degree asks, "How much will it cost?"

The graduate with a Fine Arts degree asks, "Do you want fries with that?"
 



Comments:
1 to 20 of 49
leadpaint
White Lead
8 articles & 211 comments since 8 Mar 2010
that's funny cos it's true...
supa_frizz
Quint Baker
29 articles & 724 comments since 20 Jul 2009
Seriously, what really happens to the bulk of fine art degree holders, if they do actually manage to bridge to something? Graphics/sign writing and advertising - shop/museum displays or what??? It doesn't seem to be solely a New Zealand problem either... so I don't think we can blame our greedy tertiary sector
supa_frizz
Quint Baker
29 articles & 724 comments since 20 Jul 2009

According to the University of Canterbury this advice is offered;

"Almost without exception, graduates of Fine Arts have a passion for their art form. You'll appreciate though, that it can be hard to earn a living from your art – particularly where you are keen to work for yourself, as a freelancer or in partnership with fellow artists. As a result, many Fine Arts graduates become ‘portfolio workers'. Through this they pursue their art form part-time and earn a wage from other types of part-time work. Alternatively, they may do part-time work for a number of employers at any one time, with the result that they are working full-time or they may work on one short contract after another. Any of these options require the development of a good business, financial and marketing sense; commercial awareness; the ability to sell – your work, expertise and skills for example, and an understanding of your legal rights.

For others, working full-time for an employer in the arts field proves possible. Some become curators, managers or exhibitions officers for galleries and museums. Others enter community arts, teaching or art therapy roles. Then, there are a number who enter the design field – often after further study and in areas as diverse as textiles, fashion, product/craft and graphics.

Every year, a significant number of Fine Arts graduates enter career areas related to their discipline, rather than discipline-specific roles. The former includes professions as diverse as advertising, publishing, public relations and other media through arts administration and events organisation to auctioneering and buying."


supa_frizz
Quint Baker
29 articles & 724 comments since 20 Jul 2009
Another case of read the fine print before signing
supa_frizz
Quint Baker
29 articles & 724 comments since 20 Jul 2009
For more info regarding "What can I do with a Degree in Fine Arts?"
http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/careers/what_can_I_do_with_a_degree_in/finearts.shtml
spam
spam
1 articles & 82 comments since 29 Mar 2010

.

volkswagen
bunrush-girl
bunrush
12 articles & 418 comments since 25 Jun 2009
The graduate with a Science degree asks “Where’s my pay packet and what exactly do I have to do to get paid around here.”

The graduate with an Engineering degree asks “Where’s my pay packet and what exactly do I have to do to get paid around here.”

The graduate with an Accounting degree asks “Where’s my pay packet and what exactly do I have to do to get paid around here.”

The graduate with a Fine Arts degree asks “How exactly do I find my way out of this corporate rabbit-warren of work-cubicles. Oh, and, fuck your pay packet.”
Lee-looking-profound-1
Artbasher
137 articles & 705 comments since 12 Feb 2005
bunrush, those sound more like the questions asked by students in the respective fields. A lot of people study accounting in order to make a good salary. A lot of people study art because they have a desire to avoid a corporate lifestyle. I'm not so sure this is their attitude after graduating. I think it's more like the first three move easily into their professions, while the fine arts grads realize to make it as a professional artist is not easy at all.
monkey-man-21623
Monkey
4 articles & 201 comments since 14 Jan 2010
Well, I think that's obvious... then they become school teachers.

As a working semi-artist ( actually a hack ) I would like to be corporate, but I have an unrealistic pre-crash 1980's idea of corporate life, and I would only want that. I could make abstract and ugly pointless foyer art with too much red and grey. Let the river run.
supa_frizz
Quint Baker
29 articles & 724 comments since 20 Jul 2009

What does an "unrealistic pre-crash 1980's idea of corporate life" entail? My memory does not lead back to the depression years. And you could always overdo metallic gold instead and camouflage yourself in with the "Made in China" gift shops EVERYWHERE

monkey-man-21623
Monkey
4 articles & 201 comments since 14 Jan 2010
go and rent "Working Girl" and "The Secret of My Success".
supa_frizz
Quint Baker
29 articles & 724 comments since 20 Jul 2009
Oh yeah I know "Secret of My Success" where Michael J. Fox bangs his aunt, to a sound track by Yellow (((OH YEAH))). I think I'm starting to get a feel for your picture
bunrush-girl
bunrush
12 articles & 418 comments since 25 Jun 2009

Artbasher, I'm honored you've rung in about my post. Your questions, about my cut-and-paste pronouncements are legitimate.

"-fine arts grads realize to make it as a professional artist is not easy at all."

In the best of all possible worlds visual arts students will take a clear eyed view of the killing odds and make a decision, early in the game, whether they require the comfort of a guaranteed salary or the considerable compensations (of another sort) afforded by a life in the arts.

Chronic whining - about how hard the artlife is or how boring corporate life is, after decision is made, and career path followed, leads to early and often medication...for corporate and artworld denizen alike.

If one follows the money in the artworld it's mostly (and consistently) ending up in the pockets of arts administrators. With the ongoing growth of the 'military-industrial-artspace' industry this trend will only increase. As it does artists will be reduced, more and more, to the status of unpaid (disregarding fees and honorariums) content providers - providing disposable programming fodder for the growing legion of spaces.

Each of these proliferating art spaces will (or do) have a small army of 'art professionals' who each get regular pay packets. As will the beehive of arts funding organizations that support and feed off of the growing administrative arts sector. The top jobs (curators & creative directors) in these organizations are, to some degree, glamorous and interesting occupations, while the rest of the positions are much like corporate sector jobs. Tedious, repetitive and unrewarding.

The money for artists is, and has always been, in the creation and sale of objects to social groups with disposable income. This social group uses art to gentrify its wealth. In the new art economy the new-puritans call this (selling art to elites) 'selling out' and painting (as a practice and trade) is singled out as the major genre-offender. The only difference (in terms of 'selling out') between artists who make work specifically for the art spaces and those who make ('sinful') objects of art trade is that one gets paid and the other doesn't. In both instances the art is produced for a relatively elite audience. One does'nt find pinched and poor fish and chippers at art openings.

One group of artists sells out for cash and the other group of artist (the artspace crowd) sells out for glory and perceived virtue. The (lucky few) artist who manages to capture public imagination (for good or bad aesthetic reasons) and sells enough objects gets to stay in the studio and harvest the compensations of a contemplative arts existence while the other artists spends her/his time in a day job, writing grant and exhibition proposals, and taking their last installation project to the recycling centre.

Alternatively, as the artworld demographic shifts toward young artists from privileged backgrounds - the children of those folks who chose to chase the dollar - will increasingly overrun artsville. These kids won't/don't have to worry about day jobs, grants, etc. thus they make up a perfect pool of for-free content providers....because they DON'T NEED THE MONEY.

What these kids are after (as are the lumpen young) is the glamour and glory. Many of thhis demographic also line up for, and get, the best arts administrative jobs. If we were able to peer into the future I think we'd see an art eco-system populated from top to bottom with the family trust crowd.

This bunch used to be satisfied with its sequestered role as collectors/bankrollers/entrepeneurs now they want the entire (more media galmorous) game for their very exclusive own.

I think they'll find, in short order, that they are bored with the exclusive company of each other and the moveable feast will move on.

Nuff-said. More than nuff-said.

Lee-looking-profound-1
Artbasher
137 articles & 705 comments since 12 Feb 2005
bravo bunrush. It's rather depressing, but I have to say I agree with much of what you say. Kind of amazing that despite all the crap sometimes there is still something of value in art and the art scene.
monkey-man-21623
Monkey
4 articles & 201 comments since 14 Jan 2010
Thank you Bunrush for your fascinating mini article, it has needled my brain all day, wondering about my place in the art-o-sphere and that of others. I wonder how many readers of Artbash are artspace object installers, I surmise that most still are lowly painters with the random sculptor here and there... but would like to know.

I wonder if I would like to sell out to the elite after all, I have squandered my existence as an elevated artist to survive as essentially an artistic tradesman for entertainment purposes. My "audience" are both the haspirational grey rinse brigade and the fish and chippers and a lot of work "in the community", all that is supposed to be worthy but really doesn't give much back. I wonder if I would like to sell out and be a pompous artspace cadet after all, though it is tempting... probably too late now, you do get stuck in the role you create for yourself and I just don't have the idiotic self belief needed today by successful artistes.



mathew
3 articles & 203 comments since 2 Oct 2007
You mentioned "working Girl" Monkey.....a tutor of mine mentioned that movie not so long ago. Coincidence?
monkey-man-21623
Monkey
4 articles & 201 comments since 14 Jan 2010
( Humming etc.)

We're coming to the edge,
Running to the water.
Coming through the fog,
Your sons and daughters

let the river run,
Let all the dreamers
Wake the nation,
Come, the new Jerusalem

Silver cities rise.
The morning lights
The streets that meet them.
And sirens call them on
With a song

It's asking for the taking
Trembling. shaking.
Oh. my heart is aching

We're coming to the edge.
Running on the water.
Coming through the fog.
Your sons and daughters

We the great and small
Stand on a star
And blaze a trail of desire
Through the dark'ning dawn

It's asking for the taking
Come run with me now,
The sky is the color of blue
You've never even seen
In the eyes of your lover.

Oh. my heart is aching.
we're coming to the edge,
Running on the water,
Coming through the fog,
Your sons and daughters.

It's asking for the taking,
Trembling, shaking.
Oh my heart is aching

We;re coming to the edge.
Running on the water.
Coming through the fog.
Your sons and daughters,

Let the river run.
Let all the dreamers,
Wake the nation.
Come, the New Jerusalem.
bunrush-girl
bunrush
12 articles & 418 comments since 25 Jun 2009
Dear Monkey,

"-idiotic self belief-" isn't just a current requirement for artists (of all stripes) it's the historical precondition for setting out to make art.

"-idiotic self belief-" hardly guarantees that what we produce will be any good, in touch with the zeitgeist, or taken up by the public. But the absence of "-idiotic self belief-" will all but guarantee that we won't get started making art of any caliber in the first place.

Art (at least the stuff manufactured since the art/life divide) has best flourished when there's ample disposable income and disposable time kicking about the culture. Elites who buy/fund the arts include church, state, mercantile fortunes and institutions. Institutions are mostly underwritten (and thus ideologically programmed) by political and mercantile elites.

To refuse (or more likely, pretend to refuse) to take the elite's money (i.e. sell out) in trade for art (as opposed to less socially useful luxury items) is to leave money on the table. Money, left on the table, will get spent, one way or the other, on more frivolous, or worse yet, less interesting stuff.

The less interesting stuff that gets made (i.e. interesting art of all types) means a duller existence for artists and everyone else...in descending order. Beginning with artists - as they are usually the most easily bored human specimens.

Take the fucking money. Make the fucking art. Take some more of their fucking money and make more fucking art.

Good Night

leadpaint
White Lead
8 articles & 211 comments since 8 Mar 2010
A successful curator once informed me that "all artists are just failed art curators".
bunrush-girl
bunrush
12 articles & 418 comments since 25 Jun 2009
"all artists are just failed art curators".

If your successful curator were a wrestler then his/her semantic move would be called a reversal.

Actually, many curators and art historians, I've met are in fact failed artists. On occasion their historical failure reults in a deep seated animus toward artists who are - still doin' it.

Or your curator could be a case of 'the dentist sees the world as a tooth.'
Join or Login to comment
Page Loads
1 4 5 6 1